Monthly Archives: January 2017

God, Kim Burrell, Ellen Degeneres, and beer

F.E.Feeley Jr

Earlier I watched Pharrell on Ellen and they spoke about Kim Burrell. You can watch their discussion here. This was a really great way to deal with The Kim Burrell’s ‘sermon’.

This was a really great way to deal with The Kim Burrell’s ‘sermon’.

Tolerance of intolerance is itself, intolerant.

Unlike the Gaine’s family – Kim decided to step out into this subject and condemn and even spoke about ‘gay people dying in 2017.”
But if Kim actually read her Bible, and was a Biblical Literalist – she had no business preaching in the first place. The Bible strictly prohibits women, preachers. It also prohibits women in pants. And cutting their hair. And speaking to men in an authoritative position and on it goes. It’s not only a sin – it’s an abomination.

And the list of abominations and sins was not to make a laundry list so people can…

View original post 849 more words

The Church of Whosoever: Extra Grace Required

51i92if1vql-_sx322_bo1204203200_

The Church of Whosoever: Extra Grace Required by Robert Hill

Followers of my blob will be surprised at this review. It isn’t my normal genre, but as I know the author, I promised to read and review.

_____________________________________________________

The Church of Whosoever: Extra Grace Required follows the intersecting lives of LGBT Christians as they strive to express their faith and cope with the after-effects of their pastor’s heart attack. Among the congregants are a single grandmother, evicted from her home and marginalized by her family, wondering what comes next; a lesbian couple struggling to be good foster parents to a young man who’s discovering his way; an African-American female impersonator returning to COW after a long absence and finding the love of his life; a dual-gendered man, whose son runs away after finding him dressed in women’s clothes, giving these clothes to Goodwill and vowing to play it straight; a nameless chain-smoker lurking in the church’s shadows and imagining the worst; and diverse others – whose stories touch upon the challenges faced by LGBT Christians as they strive to embrace and share God’s love and reconcile themselves to a world that often doesn’t support them – collectively considering how to respond to their long-serving pastor’s imminent retirement.

_______________________________________________________

This book is roughly based on a real church. A church where everyone is welcome regardless of age, gender, race, orientation, or financial circumstance. In other words, whosoever. Whosoever walks through the door is welcome.

For a first novel, the writing is not bad.

The author has stated he feels this is a new genre, LGBT/Christian fiction, which it is not. Many people think that LGBT and Christian are not compatible. I do feel, however, that this genre has a limited audience.

Although the publisher has listed this as a romance, I feel it is more of a drama. There are romantic undertones, but they are not the main focus. The main focus is on a deep faith and fellowship with God and Jesus.

If you are looking for a ‘feel-good’ read that emphasizes a true Christian spirit, you’ll like this book.

 

I’m giving it 4 stars because there are a few problems in editing.

_______________________________________________________

Robert Hill was raised in an Army family, then served 20 years as a U.S. Army officer. After retiring from active duty, he spent a decade working in broadcasting and education and, as fate would have it, returned to the Army as a civilian, writing doctrine and developing curriculum. He’s been a life-long churchgoer, going where the spirit has led. Over the years, he and his family have been members of Episcopal, Methodist, Presbyterian and Metropolitan Community Church congregations. After spending a year in Afghanistan from 2009-2010, he decided at age 54 to get a tattoo. He chose these words from 1 John 4:18 — There is no fear in love, for perfect love casts out all fear. This is his first novel.

Familiar Path by A. M. Burns

new-cover

Familiar Path by A. M. Burns reviewed by A. T. Weaver

A gay Harry Potter? Why not?

At the beginning, Familiar Path seems all too familiar. A young person reaches a certain age and strange things happen. Sounds like Harry Potter and Sabrina the Teenage Witch. However, that is only the beginning. From there, it branches out to an enjoyable read for young people.

 

Lugh McNeal doesn’t know he was named for a Celtic God or that his birthday falls on the Pagan holiday of Lughnasadh.

He and his mother just moved from sunny Florida to Steamboat Springs, CO. after the death of his father.

On his fifteenth birthday, he wakes to an overwhelming urge to go to the river. There with the aid of a local teenager, Wyn, he rescues a gray kitten that was thrown into the raging current.

It turns out the kitten is the offspring of a cat belonging to the owner of a local magic shop who turns out to be his father’s sister of whom Lugh had no knowledge. She informs him his father was a Magus. She also tells him the kitten is apparently his familiar and that two of his littermates have been killed.

Lugh is surprised to find he has family he never knew including a cousin, Abby, who is his age. His Aunt Catherine and Abby begin teaching him how to harness his newfound powers and abilities.

As Lugh bonds with Bran, the kitten, they uncover a group of Shadow Magi who are out to destroy the Magi of Light.

It was just a year ago Lugh told his parents he thought he liked boys more than girls. He feels an attraction to Wyn but isn’t sure of the other boy’s feelings.

 

This is an exciting, delightful book and I look forward to reading more about the adventures of Lugh, Wyn, Abby and Bran.